Tips for Your Bike Commute

Tips for Your Bike Commute

If you’re able to get through the first month of cycling to work, you are 80% more likely to be still doing it a year later, but only 2 out of 5 people who start bike commuting will get to the end of one week. 

If your plan to joining the increasing number of people commuting to work & school using their ebikes, there are several tips for you. Bike commuting not only helps the environment and saves gas money, but it can also help you stay fit, healthy and burn a few extra calories.

  • Begin with an achievable distance

If you live only a few miles from work, it is conceivable that you can commute both ways on the first day. If you live several miles away and the commute will take you 45 to 60 minutes or more, consider hitching a ride with a co-worker to get to the office, then ride home. Make the distance doable for you; don't worry about what other people might be doing. 

  •  Always put safety first

  1. Wear a helmet

Always wear a helmet when riding a ebike. Get one that fits snuggly on your head and you’ll have peace of mind.

      2. Make yourself visible 

Fully charge your taillight, riding with a bright tail light in the daylight is every bit as important as at night. Braking light timely warn signals to road users while slowing down or stopping.

  • Wear comfortable clothing

If you are commuting in the early morning or late evening hours, wear reflective gear and put a flashing tail light on your bike. For daylight commuting, wear bright colors that can easily be seen by motorists.

Electric bike (e-bike) laws vary in every state and can be confusing for riders, retailers, and suppliers. E-bike laws can be messy and difficult to understand in the U.S. Individual municipalities also enact their own laws regarding electric bikes. So it’s worth looking up what restrictions and licensing requirements might be specific to your municipality before hitting the streets or the trails.

  • Know your route 

If you know your route you will know which turns to take, and which lane to be in. This means that you won’t end up where you don’t want to go or make unnecessary detours. 

If you are stuck in traffic or have an accident, you may need to take a new route. It may lengthen your commute some, but finding roads that aren't as busy might be worth your time. Check out any bike paths in the area to see if they would be a good choice.

If you don't already know how to do it, learn how to change a flat tire.


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